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Items for Liquidation

14 February

We currently have some items at the mission that are no longer in use, but are in good working condition, that we would like to liquidate so that we can utilize the dollars to help needy households.

Updated list coming soon.

 

Contact Brian Hetzer or Amanda Becker if you have any interest or questions.

 

2017 New Year’s Resolutions

04 January

new-years-resolutions1. Volunteer more/ as a family/ regularly

  • Let us know if you want to come out and lend a hand.  Most volunteers are utilized on weekdays but do have occasional Saturday opportunities.  No special skills or tools required– just bring a willing attitude and a smile!
  • We could really use some more Hosanna Helpers– people who are generally available once a week to assist in the charitable construction program, or to help with things on campus.

2. Learn something new/ develop a hobby/ finish projects

  • Join us at a course at Hosanna Gibsonia to learn more about the aesthetic arts, or to discover a gift that you didn’t realize you had.  We have Open Studio nights where all are welcome to come work on a project, as well as courses in watercolor (January), metal sculpture making (February) & mug making (March).
  • Want to cross some projects off the list at home?  Come to a Love Your Home workshop to learn how to do-it-yourself with things like flooring, plumbing, drywall patching, etc.

3.  Give back to the community/ donate/ tithe

  • There are so many people hurting right here in our community & we could use your support to help them.
  • You can set up automatic donations at the “give now” button on the side of our website, or by calling our office.

4. Get in shape/ stay active/ be healthier

  • Sign up now for our 2017 HI-5k fun run/ walk.  The race isn’t until April 1st, so it’s great timing for a couch-to-5k goal, or even committing to be more active this spring.  Get a group of friends together to make training more fun.
  • Give us a call if you’d like to walk the trails around the ponds at our Gibsonia campus.

Hammers Hearts and Hands: September 2016

27 September

Hammers Hearts and Hands September 2016

At the mission’s Rochester campus, a large garden is planted every Spring that produces bushels upon bushels of food that is lovingly processed by our mission workers and volunteers in order that hungry people can be fed. I am always deeply amazed by the mysteries and miracles of a garden; how the soil can be properly prepared, furrows dug, seeds planted, and then the patient, watchful waiting for gentle rains, warm sunshine, germination, growth, blossoming, fruiting, and harvest. During the past several weeks, we’ve been harvesting and canning from time to time when we can break away from other work, and I have been astonished to see nearly 30 bushels of produce enter the kitchen from a patch of ground that just months ago was nothing more than fallow soil!

I think gardening is so meaningful to me because, beyond the food producing aspects of a vegetable garden, there is so much symbolism about life and faith, work and growth. In a way, all worthwhile enterprise is at least a little bit like gardening, and perhaps all of our lives are, as well.

The constructive building characteristics of Hosanna’s mission have continuously reminded me through the years of a garden’s cycles; how initiatives begin, how and in what ways growth occurs, the blossoming of effective effort into the results of work well done, the harvest-time as the seasons of collective souls change, and the important moments of reflection, preparation, the unending quest for better future methods when Winter comes to spread its white blanket over the restive ground.

For those who have dedicated themselves to God’s service through the mission’s work, we’ve often found ourselves contemplating the deep and various meanings of four cardinal values that we call “the 4 C’s” namely, Call, Charism, Compassion, and Community. I believe deeply in these values, and I think they are close to the heart of Hosanna Industries, but they are never easy to live out as they constantly challenge every one of us to rigorously pursue God’s will in our work.

God calls, but the divine call is never without consequence. When God calls a man or woman into some form of meaningful service, that call has a mysterious way of bearing heavily upon who we are, what we do, and why. In our changing and often self-centered world, I think that the thought of God’s call may be usually considered as a momentary, snapshot-like experience for the few overly-religious types out there in the human community, but I wonder if God’s call is actually something we all hear throughout all of our days like a beautiful song playing somewhere in the distance, too customary to stop and pay attention, too unnoticed to elicit obedience.

God gives all of us gifts, charisms, in abundance, but it is so easy to think that these resources are of our own fashioning, instead of the One from whom all blessings flow. Our personalities, our memories and histories, our greatest triumphs and deepest sorrows, our talents and special skills, our uniqueness as individuals all created in God’s same image, all these and so much more are gifts given to be employed in God’s service, and yet we tend to use these gifts, and misuse them, according to our own designs and directions rather than the Lord’s.

We live in a hurting world, and we ourselves are not at all impervious to injury and yet God’s Word instructs us to be compassionate toward others, always striving to set aside our own burdens and sufferings as we aim to remove these from the shoulders of others. Sometimes, it is easy to be compassionate, but though I have never found it easy to be always compassionate, I know in my heart of hearts that until and unless I do learn to be consistently compassionate, I’ll be standing as a stumbling block against God’s grace instead of serving as a bridge toward that grace.

Born as we are, usually as single individuals, we soon learn the lessons of walking and talking, thinking and being as though the meaning of life was contained in the small sphere of our private selves. The concept of community challenges us to consider an entirely different way of being. Community never degenerates the value of the individual person, but lifts the individual self into a higher form of living in which we think of others more highly than we think of ourselves, we discover our own personal value within the fabric of relatedness rather than alienation, and we learn that the best which life has to offer benefits the most instead of the least. Community can never really happen unless we are truly willing to sacrifice the sovereignty of self for the sake of others.

Call, Charism, Compassion, and Community, this is what we work with at the mission all the time, even as these issues work on us continuously through the influence of God’s Spirit. If Hosanna has a garden of the soul, these are the resources that make it grow. I cannot think of a better example than Jesus Christ, who dealt with and wrestled with the same ideas of Call, Charism, Compassion, and Community, and who in another garden called Gethsemane decided once and for all to discard His own private will in choosing the will of God which embraced the welfare of the whole world. It has been said that His apostles turned the world upside down. I think what made that possible, then, was the silent, solitary maneuver that Jesus employed in Gethsemane when He prayerfully turned upside down the “M” of “Me” into the “W” of “We”. That act may be the most important and life- saving work that any man or woman could ever do.

Soon, dear friend, the leaves will be turning, and the beauty of Autumn will be upon us. Much of the year’s work will be done. If Winter comes, there will be time for quiet reflection and rest as God’s garden lies fallow for a while. Peace to you in the days that lie ahead. Thank you for the very important things you do to keep the mission moving forward. Please pray for us, always. Get your favorite sweater ready, maybe take a walk through the soon-to-be falling leaves with a friend, light a fire, and remember, the difference between “Me” and “We” can make all the difference in the world.

-Rev. Dr. Donn Ed, Founder & Executive Director

West Virginia Flood Relief Update

15 September

Hosanna Industries will be traveling to Richwood, WV September 18th through September 23rd to help rebuild after the flood.  We will be leading over 100 volunteers to provide framing repairs, electrical work, insulation and drywall to five households, and we will be collaborating with the Rebuild Richwood team, which includes World Servants.  Over $15,000 has been raised for our West Virginia efforts, and we are grateful for the generous support so far.

All are welcome to join us as we send off the mission workers on Sunday, September 18th at 2PM at Hosanna Industries, 109 Rinard Lane, Rochester, PA 15074.

 

Conscientious Objection

24 June

Have you heard of the new FLSA laws that will be taking effect December 1, 2016?  The laws that double the minimum wage for employees to be considered salaried workers?  The laws that make everyone who earns less than $47,476 to have to keep track of their hours?

Oh man is this a frustrating law for someone who has chosen to give her life to a mission. I’m not talking about someone who has a job and is trying to figure out how to make ends meet. I’m not talking about some young administrative assistant whose boss takes advantage of her time because she needs a job and so when he asks her to stay late three or four nights a week she wearily agrees. I’m talking about a mission worker. I’m talking about someone who is called to serve the needy. I’m talking about someone strong and qualified and capable who wants to give her life answering cries for help just like Jesus did 2000 years ago.

I’ve done quite a bit of research and there doesn’t seem to be much wiggle room for a person like me within the new FLSA laws. For years when I’ve given my personal cell phone number out for work purposes I’ve told people they can call anytime between 6:30am and 10pm. For years I’ve been contacted by colleagues on what some would call my “day off”. Guess what?  People in ministry, people in mission, don’t have days off. Remember when Christ asked the people if they would pull their ox out of a ditch on the sabbath?  I think He was okay with that. I think he was actually encouraging those Pharisees to take care of the needy around them on their “day off”.  I think he was telling them to be less rigorous with keeping track of the details and more compassionate toward the people around them.

Now some 2000 years later, after 18 years of serving the Lord, of helping people anytime of the day or night whenever they need me most, of living my life right here in Southwestern Pennsylvania as a missionary serving some really needy people, now I have to start keeping track of my hours? Really?  So when I’m making dinner for my family and a colleague calls with a question do I start the clock?  I’m making dinner for my family at the same time. Does that count for anything?  Do I keep track of half the minutes that I’m on the phone?  When one of the young men I helped a few years back finds my number and calls to see if I can help him get some new glasses and interrupts my evening with my husband but I chat with this young man and ask about his family and he asks about mine, am I working?  Am I helping a friend?  What if I’m preparing a mailing to go out to friends and supporters?  Am I allowed to fold those papers while I watch the Penguins work for the Stanley Cup?  Start the clock, I’m folding quickly now because there is a break in the action. Stop the clock. The Penguins are on a power play and I want to see every second of that. Start the clock. There’s a television time out. Stop the clock. We scored. I need to cheer and watch the replay!  Seriously?  Seriously?!?

How am I going to keep track of my hours?  This changes everything. I’ve given my life to this little mission. I’ve chosen to serve the needy in our community even when it isn’t convenient, even when it makes life a little crazy sometimes, even though I could be making double my income if I’d have chosen to use my college degree instead of helping the poor. And now I have to keep track of my hours??  Ugh.

And you know what is even more frustrating and disconcerting?  New folks. New young people who come on board with our mission. We could offer them $47,476 as a starting salary so they don’t have to keep track of their time and they can learn to eat, sleep, and drink mission work. They can be immediately immersed in giving of oneself to others. But where is the sacrifice in that?  $47,476 is a lot of money for a kid just starting out. It’s not a sacrifice to earn that kind of money. It’s an awfully good job for a 20 year old. See there, starting out with a salary of $47,476 immediately takes out the calling of Christ on one’s life and makes the same work a job. My labors for the past 18 years have been the work of Christ, the work of a mission worker, the answering of a call. But anyone we hire to work alongside me will be thinking that this is a pretty good job; you don’t even need a college degree and you can make a real good living. Well that changes the whole ethos of this organization that I have been a part of molding and shaping for almost half my life. This changes everything.

Ok so instead of giving these young people a salary now we choose to pay them by the hour. We tell them to give their lives to answering the call. We tell them how important it is to be ready to serve whenever there is a need. We tell them that they need to listen for God’s word. And now we are also going to say, “and don’t forget to punch in whenever you need to respond.”  When that phone call comes at 10:30 at night, start the clock. When you take a tool to be repaired on your way to the grocery store to get some food, make sure the clock is running, I think. Actually, I’m not really sure. Are you working while you are driving toward the grocery store or only as you are heading to the tool repair shop a quarter mile further away?  Let me get the rule book and see. If I text you after you’ve clocked out for today because something came up and the plan for tomorrow needs to change, do you clock back in while you read and respond to my text?  Give your life to Christ. Answer the cries for help that you hear all around you. Do it sacrificially. Oh, and keep track of your time while you do it.

FLSA blog

Don’t get me wrong folks. I believe people should be treated fairly. I believe they should earn enough money to take care of themselves and their family. I believe in time to work and time to rest. I know that mission work isn’t for everyone.  Sometimes mission work is hard. Sometimes it requires incredible sacrifice.  Sometimes even the most committed mission worker gets tired and needs a break. But guess what?  I wouldn’t change it.

An elderly man used to carry his middle aged son in and out of his house everytime they left the home because his boy was disabled and they couldn’t afford a wheelchair ramp. An elderly lady used to sleep with buckets on her bed whenever it rained because her roof leaked right onto her bed everytime it rained. A woman suffering from cancer didn’t have running hot water in her home for six months because her hot water tank had stopped working. A young family was living with their coats on, their oven door open, and a couple of space heaters for weeks in the winter before my mission learned of their plight and sent someone to replace their furnace.  And what about the husband, wife, and teenage boy whose only food was a head of lettuce and two apples when we entered their home?   Or the lady with diabetes whose insurance changed and without our help couldn’t get to her dialysis appointments anymore?  The list goes on and on.  3200 needy households served in 26 years.

Giving yourself sacrificially to a mission might be difficult but it is nothing compared to the suffering experienced everyday by so many people we help.

There have been many changes throughout the years that have affected our mission. Workers compensation adjustments, health insurance changes and significant price increases, licensing requirements, new taxes, so on and so forth.  Many of these have been expensive changes. They have required us to spend donated dollars that otherwise could have been used to help the needy. None, though, in my estimation, have affected the mission like these new FLSA laws. These affect the ethos of the mission. These take away the opportunity for our mission workers to give of themselves sacrificially without seeking reward or compensation. These teach new staff members to think of their time, their needs, their desires above the needs of hurting households crying out for help, above the needs of the mission, above the call of Christ.

I don’t know what to do about the new FLSA laws.  I don’t know how to keep track of my hours and I certainly don’t know how to teach a young person to give their whole heart, soul, mind and strength to the Lord and His work.  But I will continue to try.

– Julie Wettach, Mission Worker

Guidestar Platinum Early Adopter

12 May

Hosanna Industries is one of the first organizations to receive the Platinum Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, the world’s largest source of nonprofit information. GuideStar recently launched the Platinum participation level to help nonprofits celebrate their results for free! By sharing these metrics, we help the sector move beyond simplistic financial ratios to assess nonprofit progress.

We chose to display quantitative metrics such as number of facilities improved, number of volunteers and number of people trained to represent how hard Hosanna Industries is working toward achieving our mission.

We’re proud to use GuideStar Platinum to share our full and complete story with the world. We achieved Platinum by completing GuideStar’s preceding participation levels of Bronze, Silver, and Gold. Each provided stakeholders with increasingly detailed organizational information ranging from basic contact information to programmatic information.

guidestar_platinum_seal_of_transparency