News from Hosanna Industries

The latest and greatest from the crew at Hosanna Industries!

March 2017 Newsletter / Hammers, Hearts, and Hands

05 April

March 2017 Newsletter

A few days ago, I stopped at the mission’s Gibsonia campus to check on a few things, and was delighted to arrive just as Amy and Emily were unloading the kiln from the previous day’s firing. They took a moment to show me the beautiful results, and I was thrilled to see the finished work of a dozen participants, most of them novices, who recently attended the mission’s four week clay construction class. Coffee mugs, trays, bowls, and other interesting and useful articles had been hand-crafted from clay, allowed to thoroughly dry, fired once, then glazed in a variety of colors and styles, and finally fired once again to melt the glaze onto the surface as a permanent glass coating. I was really impressed with the designs, the workmanship, and the final results. I hope you can become involved in one or more of the many programs offered there in the months to come, each of which is intended to further develop your God-given creative instincts in a setting that is focused on the One from Whom all blessings flow.

As I handled and observed these newly-fired ceramic creations, I thought about what they once were. Clay is a truly amazing substance. It comes from the earth. It can be wedged, formed, rolled into a coil or a slab, or thrown on a wheel. It can be shaped, while soft, into a countless number of shapes, forms and structures. When the shaping process is over, the item is left to dry thoroughly, until void of moisture content. At this stage, the item is called Greenware, and although it is hard and breakable, it can actually be reconstituted into pliable clay once again if exposed to enough water.

Once the first firing takes place, however, the Greenware is converted into Bisqueware. This is a physical transformation that turns the Greenware into a hard, brittle, glasslike substance that is no longer capable of absorbing water anymore. The firing process changes the clay into something it never was before, rendering impossible any chance of returning to what it once was. You can take a piece of the Bisqueware and grind it into a fine powder and mix it with water, but even in this state, it will never return to clay. This thermal process, known as vitrification, changes the clay forever.

A few hours ago, I had the privilege of listening to a newly posted podcast of a sermon preached by the Rev. Dr. Richard A. Morledge, then pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Bakerstown, on Palm Sunday, April 8, 1990. This sermon and nearly 30 years’ worth of others are being made available due to the graciousness of Dr. Morledge, the tedious efforts of our friend,Tom Shoup, who copied more than 1000 sermons from cassette tapes to a digital system, and the labors of Amanda Becker and Julie Wettach, both mission workers at Hosanna Industries, who are methodically uploading those sermons onto a newly established “It’s a Great Day in the Kingdom” podcast site which is linked to Hosanna’s website. We hope that these proclamations will be helpful to you in your own journey of faith, and I encourage you to frequently listen to these sermons as preached by a man whom I consider to be one of the greatest communicators of the Gospel in our lifetimes.

In the particular sermon which I listened to, Dr. Morledge described those whom he referred to as “Hosanna people”, those who are in desperate need, people who are crying out for God’s help. He taught that the word “Hosanna”, heard by Jesus on the first Palm Sunday 2000 years ago, was not really a word of praise as is commonly thought, but was instead a prayer. Its true meaning is, “Save us now.” Jesus answered that prayer in seven days. Later He sent His Spirit on the first Pentecost to equip the newly born Church to be His body in the world, continuing His great work of salvation.

Then Dr. Morledge went on to describe to the congregation of that great Church that a new mission was to be launched that day. Its name would be Hosanna Industries.

Following the sermon, additional words were spoken, announcing what this new mission was intended to do: “Whenever – wherever we hear as Christians the Hosanna cries of God’s needy children, our faith demands that we do something, representing a powerful Savior instead of an impotent theological idea. We cannot anymore bear the shamefulness of poverty that is unaddressed, nor can we bear mission mediocrity… this Church today in establishing Hosanna Industries is proclaiming loud and clear that ultimately some day the love of God in Christ will heal all the world’s ills.”

The mission was born as an outward expression of the Kingdom of God. It was born to proclaim the Good News by way of home construction, repair and rehabilitation for the poor; vocational training of the unskilled; small business development for would-be entrepreneurs; job creation for new and future mission workers; and volunteer mobilization, locally and beyond, to locations of impoverishment and calamity.

The first five young mission workers were called forward from the congregation. The first assistance project was to begin the very next day, less than a mile away from the church, at the home of an elderly woman and her disabled daughter. Their income was less than half of what the government defined as poverty level. A newly donated used pick-up truck was parked outside, donated by the late Frank Reese, president of North Pittsburgh Telephone Company, painted Hosanna green by Bart Williams, president and owner of Parks Moving and Storage and serviced by Tom Henry of Tom Henry Chevrolet.

Then, as this unique worship service drew near to its ending, Dr. Morledge asked the mission workers to kneel at the chancel, he asked the more than 500 people in attendance to rise, and he asked all to join hands.

At that moment, a Spirit of quiet holiness descended upon that assembly of believers. Some people shed tears. As I listened to the recording, I sensed a nearly palpable silence in that place 27 years ago. Then, with his voice momentarily breaking, Dr. Morledge offered the following prayer:

“Father, in faith we reach out to try to follow You, and like Abraham of old we’re not quite sure where we’re going but we go now to be your people in this community and clear to the uttermost parts of the world. Father, thank you for these individuals whom we set apart in Your name, please indue them with your Holy Spirit and empower them to be people who reach to the Hosanna people and in ministering may they be ministered unto, and as we join hands as a great church, Father, bind us in this time of faith, not with criticism but with our love, to try to grow and become even greater the people that you want us to be. We thank you for all of the blessings of the past and now we ask a special blessing. So please Father, to these six individuals, whom we now set apart and commission as mission workers of Hosanna Industries, thank you Father, thank you, please place Your Hands upon the heads of these particular missioners. Thank you Father, we feel Your Presence, we go out in faith in Christ’s name, Amen.”I knelt with those five young men that day, and remember the first sounds a new-born mission heard were those of the organ, beautifully phrasing,“Hosanna in the Highest!”

We were clay then. Soft, pliable, malleable. We were ready to be shaped by the Potter’s Hands.

I suppose the years have vitrified us through the hard and often difficult firing of work, striving, learning, succeeding, and sometimes failing. Whatever we may or may not be, I’m certain we could never go back to become what we once were. Though we’ve learned much, and tried hard to refine our efforts into a vessel of grace useful to the hands of God in this world, I still hope that something within the heart of Hosanna is yet soft and pliable, ready to be shaped at the Master’s bidding.

Over the years, Hosanna Industries has been privileged to help more than 3400 needy households. We’ve blitz built almost 200 new homes. We’ve received more than 160 mission workers, each one leaving a mark, some weaving at least a part of their hearts into the mission’s own heart. In the past 27 years, the mission has travelled about 2 1/2 million miles, moving more than 60,000 tons of material, working with about 150,000 volunteers, in spending less than 16 million dollars to get almost 60 million dollars worth of work done. We’ve had a presence in 35 states, provided disaster relief work in nearly a dozen locations, and given assistance to more than 40 charitable organizations who needed help. We’ve provided intensive trade-skill training for hundreds of people, and we’ve witnessed the creation of at least ten small entrepreneurial businesses that were an outgrowth of our influence. On occasion, the Lord has sent us abroad to five different countries, and we have hosted volunteers from a half-dozen nations and all 50 states in the United States of America.

Just a few days ago, I held a newly fired ceramic cup in my hands and admired its beauty. I can estimate the time when, not long ago, it was nothing but a lump of clay, but I could never know for how long it may be of future service to someone who finds it useful.

I believe God inspired the birth of Hosanna Industries. I’m grateful that His hands have molded and shaped this mission into the vessel of His choosing. I’m very grateful that the commissioning prayer of Dick Morledge 27 Palm Sundays ago has been answered innumerable times.

The cries of the Hosanna people have been heard, not ignored. I don’t know how long this vessel called Hosanna will be useful to God’s hands, but I’m so deeply grateful for your part in it, and for all who have gone before. Without you, and all the other wonderful, gracious, generous, believing people like you, I don’t think God could have ever shaped the mission His hands have made.

Happy 27th birthday, Hosanna! And thank you, dear Hosanna friend!

~DDE

Rev. Dr. Donn Ed, Executive Director & Founder

Isn’t that the way it’s supposed to be?

28 March

At Hosanna, we encounter hundreds of individuals every year: clients, volunteers, business men and women, etc.  Among those, usually at least a handful stand out in our minds.

I believe I have met a couple of them already this year!  One homeowner in particular stands out for me so far this year.  She was the daughter of the homeowner.  She had been through a lot in her life, more than any of us ever endure, and yet she greeted me with a smile and bright attitude when I met her for the first time upon inspecting the home.

It ended up that we would replace 8 windows for the household.  Sometimes at Hosanna, plans change quickly.  I phoned Diane the evening before we were planning to come and she was very excited.

Upon arrival the next morning, all the window treatments were down and lunch was being prepared while we installed the windows.  She was also receiving a new gas oven to replace her 30 year old appliance that very same day!

At one point, Diane had mentioned that she didn’t sleep much the night before preparing for us and shopping and preparing food.  She looked exhausted by lunch time.  It was one of the best lunches we’ve ever had made for us by a homeowner!

At day’s end, I commented that she worked harder than us and she said, “Well isn’t that the way it’s supposed to be?” I was taken back by such a comment.  As we live in a society where most everyone expects much with little to no input, Diane stood out like a beautiful rose in a field of tall grass.

It was an honor to serve Diane, her mother, and Diane’s daughter and to provide them with warm safe new windows.

Praise God from Whom all Blessings Flow!

-Becky Hetzer, Mission Worker

More Lights

03 March

Earlier this week, I started my work day as I normally do.  Check the emails, respond to any messages, outline my day, la la la.  I couldn’t help but notice that I felt a little off.  Maybe another cup of coffee?  That didn’t change the feeling.  How about a slice of pizza?  (Yes, cold pizza for breakfast.)  Pizza didn’t do it either.  I still felt something was off.  I checked in with many of my coworkers.  What’s my problem?

As I was checking in with everyone I realized what was bothering me.  Some of my work family aren’t here, so I can’t check in with them.  They are in Richwood, West Virginia, serving the community there.  I’m certainly glad they are there doing what they are doing and I am very proud of them.

Since I came to Hosanna, one of the big themes has been Community.  Do things together.  Work together, learn together, discuss together, laugh together, chances are you’re going to suffer together; but what a blessing it is to be together.  It’s always hard on me when the team gets “split up” for the sake of what needs done.  I just don’t like the feeling of being separated.  Did you ever put two different socks on- one kind of thick like a boot sock and the other thin like a dress sock- it kind of feels like that.  Just a little weird.

Then I remembered that Jesus didn’t always keep all of the disciples together, and that sometimes they had to go out in smaller groups or pairs, in order to multiply.  I remind myself that being separated doesn’t mean you’re less, it just means that the light has now been multiplied.  When we are all together as one big green machine, we are (when we have our heads and hearts in the right place) a bright light, and when we become separated- when the Lord needs some of us here and some of us there- the light doesn’t dim but it becomes more LIGHTS, to work in more places, and to touch more people.  How wonderful is that!  I think that I would rather have many bright lights on my Christmas tree than just one big shining bulb.

Amen to learning things!  Amen to lights!

Dear reader, wherever you are, whatever you’re doing; if you feel a bit lost or a bit disconnected, just let that light shine even brighter, and it will spread!

-Emily Cadenhead, Mission Worker

Creative Support Spring 2017

16 February

We are so grateful for the creative ways that individuals & organizations support the mission of Hosanna Industries!  Contact Amanda if your business or organization would like to support us in a creative way, whether that be through a fundraiser, collection, special sale, etc., we would love to hear your ideas.

 

Shawn Marie Bacon participated in our Galentine’s Day Celebration at Hosanna Industries’ Gibsonia campus, with her business ViaOneHope.  For every purchase made from this link, they will donate 15% to Hosanna Industries.  Contact Shawn Marie if you have questions or would like to host a wine-tasting fundraiser for Hosanna.

 

 

Greg Emslie of Focal Point Business Coaching is hosting a time-management seminar on March 9th, & has offered to donate 10% of registration fees to Hosanna Industries.  In this fast-moving, 1/2 day workshop, you learn how to apply the most important personal management principles ever discovered to every area of your life.  Read more about the Eat That Frog seminar & register here.

 

 

Sigi & Lauren Loya at the Hormone Center have graciously given Hosanna Industries a vendor table to help us promote the mission & our programs at their Integrative Medicine Symposium on March 25th.  Lauren says that “I started to realize something  was wrong when I saw a patient  who was on 10 medications.  The first five dealt with  ailments while the second five  were for the side effects of the  first five. Despite the  medications, the patient didn’t  feel any better. This was the  beginning of my inquiry into  another way to practice  medicine.”  Read more about this event & register here.  (We do have a few free tickets, so please let us know if you’d like to be our guest for this educational morning.)

 

Items for Liquidation

14 February

We currently have some items at the mission that are no longer in use, but are in good working condition, that we would like to liquidate so that we can utilize the dollars to help needy households.

Updated list coming soon.

 

Contact Brian Hetzer or Amanda Becker if you have any interest or questions.

 

More than a turkey for Joanne

13 February

I got a call from Joanne yesterday. She reminded me that Hosanna helped her “get back on her feet” by providing much needed home repairs in 2015. Through tears she expressed how grateful she was for the assistance.  I was wondering why she was calling in April of 2016 to say “thanks” but was appreciative for the call so I just listened.

As she was wrapping up the conversation she said,” I was so thankful for the help you gave me and then at Christmas Hosanna volunteers brought me gifts and a frozen turkey!  I couldn’t believe it!

Just last week I felt well enough to spend time in the kitchen and decided to invite 4 other people to enjoy the turkey with me.  I haven’t had company in years and barely know my neighbors but they came and I told them about you folks and they wondered why strangers would give so much for free!  I told them you guys care about all people and nobody is a stranger to you.  You treated me like family.  Well, my dinner was a success and we are friends now.”

I said, “Joanne I am so glad you enjoyed the turkey!” She said, ” Oh honey, it was so much more than just a turkey! Hosanna gave me back my life.”

-from an earlier e-blast (sign up for our emails at the bottom of this website)